Hou Yifan – Anatoly Karpov

 16 yr old phenom vs. legendary champ

About Bart7

Chess enthusiast and wanna be blogger ..Supporter of God,Family,USA and Gaming. Long live the Q.G.and Freedom.[GTh:77]
Bookmark the permalink.

2 Comments

  1. Anatoly Karpov.. 59 yr old Russian, probably the most successful tournament player of all time. Hou,Yifan a phenomenally talented Chinese prodigy, 16 years old, grandmaster and already third highest ranked female in the world. They played a six-game match.This encounter between the twelfth World Champion and one of China’s most remarkable young talents took place from November 6th to 11th 2010 in Sanya City, Hainan, China. The event consisted of four classical games (90 min for all moves + 30 sec increment for each move) and two rapid chess games (25 min + 10 sec.).

    Karpov wins over Hou Yifan 3.5 – 2.5

    Hou,Yifan (2577) – Karpov,Anatoly (2619)
    Match Sanya/Hainan/China (1), 06.11.2010
    1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.Nc3 Bb4 5.0-0 0-0 6.d3 d6 7.Bg5 Bxc3 8.bxc3 Qe7 9.Re1 a6 10.Bxc6 bxc6 11.d4 a5 12.Rb1 Qe6 13.a3 Nd7 14.Nh4 f6 15.Bc1 Nb6 16.Nf5 Nc4 17.Ne3 Ba6 18.f4 Nxe3 19.Bxe3 Qc4 20.Qd2 Rae8 21.fxe5 fxe5 22.Bf2 h6 23.h3 Rf7 24.Bg3 Kh7 25.Kh2 Bb5 26.Rbd1 Re6 27.Ra1 Ba4 28.dxe5 dxe5 29.Rac1 Qc5 30.Qe3 Qxe3 31.Rxe3 Rd7 32.Rd3 Rdd6 33.Kg1 Bb5 34.Rdd1 Be2 35.Re1 Rd2 36.Bf2 Bb5 37.Be3 Rd7 38.Rcd1 Red6 39.Rxd6 cxd6 40.Bb6 a4 41.Be3 c5 42.Kf2 Rf7+ 43.Kg3 Rf6 44.Bd2? Putting the bishop on a square where it can be attacked by the black rook on f2.
    44…Kg8? [44…Bf1!-+] 45.Re3? Bc6? [45…Bf1!-+] 46.Re2 Rf1! At last! 47.Be1 Kf7 48.c4 Ke6 49.Bd2 Ra1 50.Re3 Ra2 51.Kf3 Rxc2 52.Bc3 Bb7 53.g3 Ba6 54.Be1 Bxc4 Black has picked off two pawns, The game is lost for White. 55.Rc3 Be2+ 56.Ke3 Ra2 57.Bd2 Bf1 58.h4 Bh3 59.Bc1 Bf1 60.Bd2 Kd7 61.Bc1 Kc6 62.Kf3 Be2+ 63.Ke3 Bh5 64.Bd2 Bg4 65.Kd3 Kb5 66.Ke3 0-1.

    *SOURCE CHESS BASE

  2. CHESS
    By QUAH SENG SUN

    China makes its mark on international chess scene.

    FORTY years ago, if I were to mention that chess was a popular game in China, I’m sure that you wouldn’t be thinking of any other type of chess than xiangqi, better known to many of us as Chinese Chess.

    And you wouldn’t be wrong. Yes, down the centuries, xiangqi was the most popular board game in China and really, nothing has changed till today. It will always remain their most popular board game.

    But there was a small section of people in China who decided on the big step to cross over and play what is known to you and me as international chess. It wasn’t that they were abandoning the game that was their heritage but more that they were the innovators who decided to explore beyond their cultural boundaries.

    In the years since then, there is no denying that China has become a very significant player on the international chess stage……….

    http://thestar.com.my/lifestyle/story.asp?file=/2010/11/12/lifeliving/7401702&sec=lifeliving

    White: Magnus Carlsen (Norway)
    Black: Viswanathan Anand (India)
    1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.0-0 Nxe4 5.Re1 Nd6 6.Nxe5 Be7 7.Bf1 Nf5 8.Nf3 0-0 9.d4 d5 10.c3 Bd6 11.Bd3 Nce7 12.Nbd2 c6 13.Nf1 Ng6 14.Qc2 Nfh4 15.Nxh4 Qxh4 16.g3 Qd8 17.Ne3 Re8 18.Bd2 Nf8 19.Nf5 Bc7 20.Rxe8 Qxe8 21.Re1 Be6 22.Qc1 f6 23.Qd1 Qd7 24.Qf3 Re8 25.h4 (Undeniably, White has the better game here.)
    25…Bf7 26.Rf1 Bg6 27.h5 Bxf5 28.Bxf5 Qf7 29.Kg2 g6 30.Bd3 f5 31.Rh1 Ne6 32.hxg6 hxg6 33.g4 (The first sign of tension) 33…Bf4 34.Be3 (34.Bxf4 is answered by 34…fxg4) 34…fxg4? (The second sign of tension. 34…Bxe3 would have been correct. Now, White increases his pressure on Black.)
    35.Qxg4 Kg7 36.Rh5 (The threat of 37.Rf5 would be winning.) 36…Bxe3 37.fxe3 Nf8 38.Rh3 Kg8 39.Rf3 Qe6 40.Qf4 Kg7 41.b3 Qe7 42.c4 Rd8 43.Rh3 Rd6 44.Qh6+ Kg8 45.cxd5 cxd5 46.e4 Qg7 47.Qe3 Qe7 48.e5 Rc6 49.Qh6 Qg7 50.Qh4 a6 51.Rf3 Qd7 52.b4 b5 53.a3 Qc7 54.Kg3 Kg7 55.Bb1 Nh7 56.Ba2 Qd7 57.Bb3 Rc1 58.Kh2 Rb1 59.Bc2 Rb2 60.Rc3 Qf7 61.Kg3 (The third sign of growing tension. After 61.e6, Black’s overworked queen cannot defend both his second rank and the g6 pawn.) 61…Nf8 62.Rf3 Qe6 63.Qd8?? (The fourth sign of tension. White throws the win away, having missed 63.Rf6 Qe8 64.Rf2 Ra2 65.Qf6+ Kg8 66.Bb3 Rxa3 67.Rf3. The game heads to a draw.) 63…Nd7 64.Rf2 Ra2 65.Kh2 Qg4 66.Qe7+ Kh6 67.Qd8 Qh5+ 68.Kg2 Qg4+ ½-½
    *SOURCE The Star(online)
    ** GM Hou, Yifan 2591 #3 seed In this year’s event ……
    The 2010 Women’s World Chess Championship. It will be held from December 2nd, 2010 (Arrival), to December 25th, 2010 (Departure) in Hatay, Turkey.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *